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Scavenging mitochondrial superoxide prevents spontaneous tumor metastasis

A Mitochondrial Switch Promotes Tumor Metastasis We exploited the rationale provided by our in vitro findings to evaluate mtROS scavengers, targeting the most upstream mitochondrial event that was identified, in metastasis prevention. In different human and mouse models, the metastatic phenotype as a whole was lost when tumor-bearing mice were treated with the superoxide scavenger mitoTEMPO that we preferred to other common antioxidants for its high tropism for mitochondria (TPP group) and for its demonstrated specificity ...

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Study confirms mitochondrial deficits in children with autism

Study confirms mitochondrial deficits in children with autism

NEWS | May 8, 2014 (SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Children with autism experience deficits in a type of immune cell that protects the body from infection. Called granulocytes, the cells exhibit one-third the capacity to fight infection and protect the body from invasion compared with the same cells in children who are developing normally. The cells, which circulate in the bloodstream, are less able to deliver crucial infection-fighting oxidative responses to combat invading pathogens because of dysfunction in their tiny energy-generating organelles, ...

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Mitochondria-targeted Antioxidants as Therapies

Mitochondria are central to oxidative phosphorylation and much of metabolism, and are also involved in many aspects of cell death. Consequently, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to a wide range of human pathologies. In many of these, excessive oxidative damage is a major factor because the mitochondrial respiratory chain is a significant source of the damaging reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. However, despite the clinical importance of mitochondrial oxidative damage, antioxidants have been of limited ...

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Novel antioxidant makes old arteries seem young again

May 5, 2014 • University of Colorado Boulder published in the Journal of Physiology. An antioxidant that targets specific cell structures—mitochondria—may be able to reverse some of the negative effects of aging on arteries, reducing the risk of heart disease, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. When the research team gave old mice—the equivalent of 70- to 80-year-old humans—water containing an antioxidant known as MitoQ for four weeks, their arteries functioned as well as the ...

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Mitochondrial function, energy expenditure, aging and insulin resistance.

Mitochondria are the cells’ powerhouse that produce the ubiquitous energy currency (ATP) by consuming oxygen, producing water and building up the proton motive force. Oxygen consumption is a classical means of assessing energy expenditure, one component of energy balance. When energy balance is positive, weight increases. This is observed during the dynamic phase of obesity, and during body composition changes associated with aging. Whether intrinsic defaults in mitochondria occur is the matter of this review.(more)

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